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KASATOCHI EFFECTS

 

SKY COLOUR 22 OCTOBER 2008 FOLLOWING KASATOCHI ERUPTION
 
From http://spaceweather.com - archive 20 October 2008.
 
Lingering aerosols from Alaska's Kasatochi volcano.
 
When Kasatochi erupted on 7 August 2008 it pumped more than a million tons of ash and sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere.  Much of that material is still there drifting around the Northern Hemisphere producing sunsets of subtle beauty.
 
The following picture was taken from Lower Willingdon, East Sussex at just after sunset at 1716 UTC 22 October 2008. It was also published on the spaceweather.com website and cited under Volcanic Sunsets in the archive dated 27 October 2008.
 

POSSIBLE RAY FORMATION 11 NOVEMBER 2008

At sunset 11 November 2008 the sky was clear except for some ragged dissolving cumulus clouds.  Sunset at this latitude was 1617 UTC but the presence of the elevated South Downs means that the sun drops below the visible horizon several minutes before the calculated sunset time.  As the sun went behind the hills some 'normal' anti-crepuscular rays formed from the ragged cumulus at 1556 UTC.  But at 1644 and 1645 UTC - some 27 minutes after the calculated sunset and around 45 minutes after the sun's disk had been lost behind the South Downs - faint upward rays were seen across the sky from the area where the sun would have been below the horizon.  Other internet reports attribute such effects to the Kasatochi dust etc still in the stratosphere and circulating the northern hemisphere.

The following three pictures taken from Lower Willingdon, East Sussex cover these events - all have been photographically enhanced to improve the contrast in the ray formation.